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St. Patrick's Day

St. Patrick's Day

Celebrate St Patrick's Weekend with a well-deserved break at The Ardilaun Hotel!

 Make memories that will last forever.

Enjoy a warm welcome, friendly smile and genuine hospitality from all the Team at The Ardilaun while you relax and enjoy those precious family moments. 

We are offering a two or three night family breaks that include breakfast, a dinner for adults on one evening, family welcome plate on arrival, access to leisure club with indoor swimming pool, kids pool, jacuzzi , sauna and fully equiped gym. 

The History of Saint Patrick

Saint Patrick's Day, or the Feast of Saint Patrick is a cultural and religious celebration held on 17 March, the traditional death date of Saint Patrick (c. 385 – c. 461), the foremost patron saint of Ireland.

Saint Patrick was a 5th-century Romano-British Christian missionary and Bishop in Ireland. Much of what is known about Saint Patrick comes from the Declaration, which was allegedly written by Patrick himself. It is believed that he was born in Roman Britain in the fourth century, into a wealthy Romano-British family. His father was a deacon and his grandfather was a priest in the Christian church. According to the Declaration, at the age of sixteen, he was kidnapped by Irish raiders and taken as a slave to Gaelic Ireland. It says that he spent six years there working as a shepherd and that during this time he found God. The Declaration says that God told Patrick to flee to the coast, where a ship would be waiting to take him home. After making his way home, Patrick went on to become a priest.

According to tradition, Patrick returned to Ireland to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. The Declaration says that he spent many years evangelising in the northern half of Ireland and converted thousands.

Patrick's efforts against the druids were eventually turned into an allegory in which he drove "snakes" out of Ireland, despite the fact that snakes were not known to inhabit the region.

Tradition holds that he died on 17 March and was buried at Downpatrick. Over the following centuries, many legends grew up around Patrick and he became Ireland's foremost saint.

Celebrations generally involve public parades and festivals, Irish traditional music sessions, and the wearing of green attire or shamrocks.